May 1st: The Legend of Boggy Creek (1972)

The Legend of Boggy Creek

What It’s About: A local cast re-enacts reports of Texarkana’s own version of Bigfoot, the Fouke Monster, in this docu-drama.

Why Watch it Today?:  The Legend of Boggy Creek climaxes with a re-enactment of the most sensational Fouke Monster story, in which the creature allegedly attempted to break into a family’s house.  The event occurred on this date in 1971.  The Legend of Boggy Creek terrified me when it aired on Saturday afternoon TV in my childhood, but for an adult the main attraction of this strangely compelling film is its odd character.  Not quite an exploitation film, not quite an honest documentary, the film is most fascinating when it functions as an ad hoc documentary on rural life in Arkansas in the 1960s and early 1970s, showing old timers preserving folk ways that one assumes have long since vanished.  The tales of the creature maintain a campfire story level of spookiness.  Low budget auteur Charles B. Pierce cut his teeth set decorating (and continued to do it on everything from Coffy to The Outlaw Josey Wales) and broke into independent film making with today’s film.  He also sings the bizarre ballads that pepper the film, including one that speculates on the lonely life of the creature.  The songs give the film the feeling of  a demented Disney nature documentary.  The Legend of Boggy Creek was a surprise hit for Pierce, grossing 22 million dollars, largely at rural drive-ins, making it the seventh highest grossing film of 1972!

Lonely Cry, Pierce’s tender ballad that speculates on the life of the creature:

Travis Crabtree’s Song:

Trailer:

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2 comments on “May 1st: The Legend of Boggy Creek (1972)

  1. sasfootbigquatch says:

    Reblogged this on Armchair Bigfooter.

  2. T.A. Gerolami says:

    G ratings really did mean something very different in 1971.

    I was probably 5 or 6 when I saw it, and at that age I was pretty easy to scare. The fact that I thought it was real was the main reason, I think.

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